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Jonathan Taylor Makes his Case for MVP


NFL Week 11 – Jonathan Taylor of the Indianapolis Colts enjoyed a monster game against the Buffalo Bills on Sunday, rushing for 185 yards and four touchdowns and adding a fifth scoring play as a receiver. He’s only the fourth player in league history to amass that kind of rushing yardage and score five touchdowns in a single game, the first since Clinton Portis did it with Denver in 2003. It was the best rushing performance we have measured in a decade and a half, and among the best in our database going back to 1983.

A second-round draft pick out of Wisconsin in 2020, Taylor started 13 games as a rookie in Indianapolis, but split time in a committee with veterans Nyheim Hines and Jordan Wilkins, each of whom carried the ball about one-third as often as Taylor. Taylor’s workload has grown this season, up from 15.5 carries per game to 17.5, and his production has gone up as well, from 5.0 yards per carry to 5.8. He has rushed for at least 100 yards in six of his last eight games, averaging 6.3 yards per carry and 118.9 per game over that stretch, adding 13 rushing touchdowns.

On Sunday, he took the field against a Bills defense that has allowed only one other 100-yard rusher this season. He made a dramatic statement on the Colts’ very first drive, on which he totaled a half-dozen carries:

  • 3-yard gain on third-and-2
  • 10-yard gain on second-and-2
  • 6-yard gain on first-and-10
  • 10-yard gain on second-and-4
  • 3-yard gain on first-and-goal from the 6
  • 3-yard touchdown on second-and-goal

That’s 35 yards, four first downs, and six successful plays in a row. There were a handful of teams that didn’t have that many rushing first downs or successful runs in entire games this week. And that was just the first drive. Taylor finished with 46 rushing yards in the first quarter, 33 in the second, 75 in the third, and 31 in the fourth, not to mention the quartet of rushing scores he produced along the way. That steady production largely explains why he ended up so high in our list of great rushing games.

Best Running Back Games, Rushing DYAR, 1983-2021
Year Player Team Rush
DYAR
Runs Yds Avg. TD Wk Def
1997 Corey Dillon CIN 126 39 246 6.31 4 15 TEN
2006 Joseph Addai IND 121 24 171 7.13 4 12 PHI
2005 LaDainian Tomlinson SD 117 21 192 9.14 3 3 NYG
1991 Barry Sanders DET 116 23 220 9.57 4 13 MIN
2021 Jonathan Taylor IND 112 32 185 5.78 4 11 BUF
2000 Fred Taylor JAX 111 30 234 7.80 3 12 PIT
2010 Arian Foster HOU 110 33 231 7.00 3 1 IND
2009 James Harrison CLE 109 34 286 8.41 3 15 KC
2014 Jonas Gray NE 104 37 201 5.43 4 11 IND
2004 Edgerrin James IND 104 23 204 8.87 1 11 CHI
1986 Curt Warner SEA 103 24 192 8.00 3 16 DEN
2002 Priest Holmes KC 101 23 197 8.57 2 12 SEA

Taylor is the first player to get to 112-plus rushing DYAR in a single game since Joseph Addai (another former Colts player—maybe there’s something in the water in the White River) in 2006. He’s notable on this list for his relatively low average gain. Only Jonas Gray (an amazing one-game wonder—201 yards in one game, 387 in his other 15) averaged fewer yards per carry in this table. Taylor had some chunk plays this week—a 40-yarder in the third quarter, five other carries that gained at least 10 yards—but compared to the other games in this list, he was downright plodding.

What he lacked in explosiveness, however, Taylor made up for in reliability. Only three of his 32 carries went for no gain or a loss; eight players were stuffed more often in Week 11. Meanwhile, Taylor ran for 14 first downs, eight more than anyone else. In particular, Taylor was nearly automatic in short yardage. He had 11 carries with 4 yards or less to go for a first down and picked up a first down 10 times. The one exception was a run for no gain on second-and-1 in the red zone; the Colts gave him the ball again on third-and-1 and he picked up 3 yards, adding his last rushing touchdown shortly thereafter. (If you’re curious, 62% of all runs with 4 yards or less to go have been converted this season.)

We’re about 600 words into this and have barely mentioned what Taylor did as a receiver … not that there’s a lot to say. He had a 4-yard loss on first-and-10, a 23-yard touchdown on second-and-5, and an incomplete target on second-and-20. That’s only 6 receiving DYAR, but it’s enough to get Taylor onto the list of best combined DYAR games too.

Best Running Back Games, Combined DYAR, 1983-2021
Year Player Team Total
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
Runs Yds TD Pass Rec Yds TD Wk Def
2002 Priest Holmes KC 152 101 52 23 197 2 7 7 110 1 12 SEA
2006 Joseph Addai IND 145 121 24 24 171 4 3 3 37 0 12 PHI
1997 Corey Dillon CIN 135 126 9 39 246 4 2 2 30 0 15 TEN
2005 LaDainian Tomlinson SD 134* 117 -13 21 192 3 7 7 28 0 3 NYG
1985 Lionel James SD 133 37 96 7 51 1 12 11 168 1 10 LARD
1991 Barry Sanders DET 131 116 15 23 220 4 4 4 31 0 13 MIN
1998 Marshall Faulk IND 131 89 41 17 192 1 8 8 75 1 13 BAL
1983 Tony Collins NE 124 124 -1 23 212 3 1 1 5 0 3 NYJ
2000 Marshall Faulk STL 123 95 28 32 220 2 8 8 41 1 17 NO
1983 Eric Dickerson LARM 120 119 1 30 199 3 3 3 21 0 5 DET
2021 Jonathan Taylor IND 118 112 6 32 185 4 3 3 19 1 11 BUF
2007 Brian Westbrook PHI 117 58 59 14 110 2 5 5 111 1 3 DET
* Total DYAR includes 30 pass DYAR for a 26-yard touchdown pass.

It has been a long, long time since a new name has joined this table. Taylor is the first addition since Brian Westbrook in 2007.

So does Taylor have a serious shot at the MVP award? He’s now up to 1,122 rushing yards, nearly 200 more than anyone else (and second-place Derrick Henry won’t be making up ground anytime soon). He’s also first with 1,444 yards from scrimmage (over 300 more than second-place Cooper Kupp) and 13 rushing touchdowns, and his 83-yard gain against Houston remains the longest run of the season. (He didn’t score on that play, but Indianapolis gave him the ball again on each of the next three snaps, and he got into the end zone on third down.)

His advanced stats are even more impressive. Though he has negative DVOA as a receiver, his rushing DVOA has risen from 3.8% as a rookie to 31.0% this season. That’s second-best among running backs with at least 50 carries behind—this is true—Jacksonville’s James Robinson. (The AFC South consists entirely of three dominant running backs and also the Houston Texans.) Combine that efficiency with Taylor’s 193 carries (still second to Henry even though Henry hasn’t played in three weeks) and you get 356 rushing DYAR. Nobody else has even 200. Extrapolate that DYAR total over 17 weeks and you get a historic season:

That’s FO editor-in-chief Aaron Schatz, who also notes that Taylor has faced the toughest schedule of defenses of any running back this year. That only makes his raw totals more impressive.

If Taylor is going to seriously contend for the MVP award, the Colts will probably need to not just make the playoffs, but earn a high seed. Our current playoff odds give them about a 2-in-3 chance of qualifying for the postseason, but only a 12.3% chance of catching the Titans in the AFC South. That means they will probably will not be division champions, though at 22.4% they are currently the slight favorites in a wide-open field to get the fifth seed as the top wild-card team.

As for that 1-in-3 chance they miss the playoffs entirely? Well, that’s what the Offensive Player of the Year award is for, right?

Quarterbacks

Rk

Player

Team

CP/AT

Yds

TD

INT

Sacks

Total
DYAR

Pass
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Opp

1.

Aaron Rodgers GB

23/33

385

4

0

2

203

197

6

MIN

Rodgers actually had negative DYAR in the first quarter, when he went 6-of-9 for 64 yards with a sack-fumble. However, he was first in DYAR in both the second and fourth quarters, and second in DYAR in the third. Over those 45 minutes, he went 17-of-24 for 321 yards with all four touchdowns and one sack. He threw six deep balls on Sunday, completing four of them for 157 yards and three touchdowns. That left him virtually tied for DYAR on deep passes with…

2.

Kirk Cousins MIN

24/35

341

3

0

2

191

191

0

GB

… this guy! Cousins turned into Daryle Lamonica against Green Bay with 14 deep throws, four more than anyone else this week. Six were completed for 180 yards and a touchdown; a seventh resulted in a 37-yard DPI. Cousins was well-rounded, however, and also had the best DYAR on throws to receivers at or behind the line of scrimmage, going 6-of-7 for 49 yards.

3.

Justin Herbert LAC

30/41

382

3

1

2

153

122

32

PIT

Herbert’s first pass of the third quarter was incomplete. So was his last pass of the third quarter. In between, he completed eight passes in a row for 101 yards and a touchdown. He was nearly perfect from under center, going 6-of-7 for 71 yards with every completion picking up a first down, plus a 3-yard DPI on an eighth throw.

4.

Taylor Heinicke WAS

16/22

206

3

0

3

124

119

5

CAR

The most clutch passer of Week 11 was Mr. Heinicke, who led all quarterbacks in DYAR on third/fourth downs (9-of-11 for 124 yards and six conversions, including a touchdown) and in the red zone (three passes, three completions, three touchdowns, for a total of 22 yards).

5.

Colt McCoy ARI

35/44

328

2

0

2

99

107

-8

SEA

McCoy ripped up the middle of Seattle’s defense, going 13-of-15 for 119 yards and two touchdowns, plus a 3-yard DPI. He was also tops in DYAR on throws to tight ends, going 8-of-10 for 88 yards and two scores, plus that 3-yard DPI. Obviously, there’s a fair amount of overlap in those two categories.

6.

Tom Brady TB

30/46

307

2

1

0

89

86

3

NYG

7.

Cam Newton CAR

21/27

189

2

0

1

61

52

9

WAS

Newton gets 9 rushing DYAR for his eight carries for 47 yards and a touchdown. You probably saw his 24-yard scoring scamper on the highlight shows, but he only ran for two other first downs. He’s dinged heavily for a 3-yard loss on first-and-10 and a failure to convert on third-and-1. As a passer, his 27-yard touchdown pass to Christian McCaffrey tied the game at 21-all early in the fourth quarter, but he only threw for one first down after that, going 7-of-9 for only 45 yards with a sack.

8.

Jalen Hurts PHI

13/24

147

0

0

3

58

11

47

NO

Hurts gets 47 rushing DYAR for his 16 carries for 71 yards and three touchdowns. He loses lots of DYAR for a 3-yard loss on first-and-10 and a 6-yard loss on third-and-2, but he ran for seven first downs in all, six of them third-down conversions, two of them on gains of 20-plus yards. He also hit some big plays on third down as a passer, going 6-of-10 for 86 yards, but only picked up five conversions while giving up two sacks.

9.

Ben Roethlisberger PIT

28/44

273

3

0

3

50

50

0

LAC

Pittsburgh’s second-half rally on Sunday night was fueled mostly by a boatload of Chargers mistakes, but also by Roethlisberger’s dominant performance on no-huddle plays, where he went 10-of-11 for 93 yards and a touchdown. Every one of those plays came in the third and fourth quarters.

10.

Carson Wentz IND

11/20

106

1

0

0

48

58

-10

BUF

Wentz’s average dropback came with a league-high 10.7 yards to go for a first down. He picked up four first downs in five plays with less than 10 yards to go, but just one in eight with exactly 10, and one in seven with longer yardage than that.

11.

Jimmy Garoppolo SF

16/22

176

2

0

2

40

41

-1

JAX

Garoppolo gained successful yardage on 67% of his dropbacks, the highest rate in the league this week. There are lot of walks and singles baked into that on-base percentage, however—only eight of his 16 successful plays picked up first downs.

12.

Tua Tagovailoa MIA

27/33

273

2

1

0

36

42

-6

NYJ

Tagovailoa loses a league-high 64 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. Miami’s heavy reliance on RPOs severely cuts down on Tagovailoa’s downfield opportunities, but most of his big plays came on deeper throws. On balls that traveled more than 5 yards beyond the line of scrimmage, he went 8-of-10 for 147 yards with one touchdown and one interception.

Rk

Player

Team

CP/AT

Yds

TD

INT

Sacks

Total
DYAR

Pass
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Opp

13.

Trevor Lawrence JAX

16/25

158

0

0

3

36

26

10

SF

Lawrence only threw one pass down the middle against San Francisco: an 18-yard completion to Tavon Austin in the second quarter.

14.

Tyrod Taylor HOU

14/24

107

0

0

0

33

22

11

TEN

Taylor’s average pass traveled a league-low 4.4 yards beyond the line of scrimmage; he did not throw a single deep ball, with no passes deeper than 13 yards downfield. His first pass of the second half was a 7-yard gain on third-and-6, but he failed to throw for a single first down after that, going 1-of-9 for 6 yards. He also gets 11 DYAR for his six carries for 25 yards and two touchdowns. Five of those runs were scrambles; the other was an aborted snap for a 3-yard loss.

15.

Andy Dalton CHI

11/23

201

3

0

1

28

28

0

BAL

Dalton’s average completion gained 10.6 yards after the catch, most of any qualifier this week. (His teammate Justin Fields had radically different results.) That includes 62 YAC on a 60-yard touchdown to Darnell Mooney, 15 YAC on a 49-yard touchdown to Marquise Goodwin, and 40 YAC on all other plays. Despite that help from his receivers, he gained successful yardage on 29% of his dropbacks, the lowest rate in the league this week.

16.

Joe Flacco NYJ

25/39

291

2

0

2

3

6

-4

MIA

Flacco was reasonably effective at moving the Jets to midfield but struggled to do much beyond that. He only threw for two first downs in Dolphins territory, going 6-of-13 for 40 yards with one sack, one intentional grounding, and one penalty.

17.

Russell Wilson SEA

14/26

207

0

0

4

-20

-2

-18

ARI

It’s a similar story for Wilson, who threw for eight first downs inside his own 40 but only one in the rest of the field, where he went 4-of-13 for 37 yards with three sacks and a fumble. He also loses 18 DYAR for two rushing plays: a 2-yard gain on third-and-1, and a botched handoff resulting in a 14-yard loss on second-and-6.

18.

Joe Burrow CIN

20/29

148

1

0

3

-22

-26

4

LV

Burrow was perfect on throws to his left, completing each of his seven throws in that direction for 64 yards and a touchdown. Five of those completions picked up first downs; the others were a 7-yard gain on second-and-8 and a 9-yard gain on third-and-15.

19.

Patrick Mahomes KC

23/37

260

0

1

3

-22

-18

-5

DAL

Mahomes gains 53 DYAR due to opponent adjustments, tied with Matt Ryan for most in the league. Inside the Dallas 40, he went 3-of-9 for 25 yards with an interception and a sack.

20.

Derek Carr LV

19/27

215

1

1

2

-23

-23

0

CIN

The Raiders could use some work on their screen game. Carr threw six passes to receivers at or behind the line of scrimmage, completing four of them for a total of 7 yards.

21.

Justin Fields CHI

4/11

79

0

0

2

-27

-35

7

BAL

Fields’ average dropback came with a league-low 6.4 yards to go for a first down. But that didn’t stop him from throwing deep—his average pass traveled a league-high 14.2 yards beyond the line of scrimmage, while his average completion gained a league-low 1.5 yards after the catch. (His teammate Andy Fields had radically different results.)

22.

Mac Jones NE

22/26

207

1

1

3

-36

-21

-15

ATL

Jones loses 55 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He was nearly helpless in scoring range—inside the Atlanta 40, he went 6-of-8 for 52 yards with more sacks (two) than first downs (one, a 19-yard touchdown to Nelson Agholor).

Rk

Player

Team

CP/AT

Yds

TD

INT

Sacks

Total
DYAR

Pass
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Opp

23.

Baker Mayfield CLE

15/29

176

1

2

1

-42

-44

2

DET

Mayfield’s last pass of the first half was a 5-yard touchdown to Nick Chubb that put Cleveland up 13-0. Then he only threw for one first down in the second half, when he went 4-of-11 for 52 yards with an interception and a sack.

24.

Josh Allen BUF

21/35

209

2

2

1

-45

-55

11

IND

Coming out of halftime, the Bills trailed 24-7. That’s not an ideal situation, but hardly a lost cause. Allen proceeded to throw six incompletions in a row, followed by an interception. He did complete two of his last three passes in the third quarter for a total of 13 yards, but by that point the Bills were down 38-7 and the game was over.

25.

Trevor Siemian NO

22/40

214

3

2

0

-46

-61

15

PHI

Ready to have your mind blown? Siemian was the week’s best passer inside the opponents’ 40, where he went 10-of-15 for 115 yards and three touchdowns. The problem is that he was the WORST passer in the rest of the field, going 12-of-25 for 99 yards with two interceptions, including a pick-six. And yes, most of that scoring-range production came in garbage time—13 of those 15 throws came with New Orleans trailing by 14-plus points in the fourth quarter.

26.

Tyler Huntley BAL

26/36

219

0

1

6

-56

-56

0

CHI

Huntley gains zero DYAR for his seven carries for 40 yards. Only two of those runs gained first downs; none of the others gained more than 5 yards or counted as a successful play. Most of his good passes were thrown to his right, where he went 14-of-19 for 145 yards with an interception, plus two DPIs for 38 more yards.

27.

Matt Ryan ATL

19/28

153

0

2

4

-74

-74

0

NE

Ryan gains 53 DYAR due to opponent adjustments, tied with Patrick Mahomes for most in the league. Individually, the worst fourth-quarter quarterback this week was Ryan Tannehill, whom we shall get to shortly. However, we must point out that while Tannehill collected -128 DYAR in the fourth quarter, the Falcons trio of Ryan, Josh Rosen, and Feleipe Franks was significantly worse at -199. Between the three of them, Atlanta’s last eight passing plays saw more interceptions (four, at least one by each quarterback, including a pick-six) than completions (three, for only 26 yards).

28.

Tim Boyle DET

15/23

77

0

2

0

-110

-110

0

CLE

When you’re starting a third-string quarterback, you need to help him out by letting him complete short throws and make good gains after the catch. The Lions utterfly failed to do that as Boyle was last in DYAR on throws to receivers at or behind the line of scrimmage, going 7-of-9 for a yard—singular. One. Four of those completions lost yardage. In related news, Boyle was also last in DYAR on throws to running backs, going 4-of-6 for a net loss of 4 yards with an interception.

29.

Daniel Jones NYG

23/38

167

1

2

2

-138

-138

0

TB

30.

Ryan Tannehill TEN

36/52

323

1

4

2

-140

-130

-10

HOU

As noted in Matt Ryan’s comment, Tannehill was the week’s worst passer in the fourth quarter, going 12-of-19 for 128 yards with three interceptions, two sacks, and a fumble. He was also worst on throws to tight ends (5-of-8 for 26 yards with an interception) and inside the opponents’ 40-yard line (12-of-18 for 76 yards with one touchdown, one intentional grounding, one sack, and two interceptions).

31.

Dak Prescott DAL

28/43

216

0

2

5

-167

-167

0

KC

Prescott led all quarterbacks with 10 failed completions. He was the NFL’s worst passer in the red zone (1-of-5 for 2 yards with an interception), on deep balls (1-of-9 for 16 yards with an interception), and on balls down the middle (five attempts, zero completions, one interception).

 

Five Best Running Backs by DYAR (Total)

Rk

Player

Team

Runs

Rush
Yds

Rush
TD

Rec

Rec
Yds

Rec
TD

Total
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Rec
DYAR

Opp

1.

Jonathan Taylor IND

32

185

4

3/3

19

1

118

112

6

BUF

2.

Austin Ekeler LAC

11

50

2

6/7

65

2

76

24

53

PIT

Ekeler was stuffed just twice while rushing for five first downs, including gains of 10 and 12 yards. He added three first downs as a receiver, including 10- and 17-yard touchdowns.

3.

Nick Chubb CLE

22

130

0

2/2

14

1

51

33

19

DET

Chubb ran for eight first downs against Detroit, with seven gains of 10-plus yards, while being stuffed just twice. Both of his catches moved the chains, including a 5-yard touchdown.

4.

Jordan Howard PHI

10

63

0

0/0

0

0

35

35

0

NO

Howard ran for four first downs against the Saints, including 13- and 18-yard runs, while being stuffed just twice. He gains 18 DYAR due to opponent adjustments.

5.

Christian McCaffrey CAR

10

59

0

7/8

60

1

33

19

14

WAS

Though McCaffrey only ran for a pair of first downs against Washington, seven of his carries gained 4 yards or more and he was only stuffed once. Three of his catches also picked up first downs, including a 27-yard touchdown.

 

Five Best Running Backs by DYAR (Rushing)

Rk

Player

Team

Runs

Rush
Yds

Rush
TD

Rec

Rec
Yds

Rec
TD

Total
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Rec
DYAR

Opp

1.

Jonathan Taylor IND

32

185

4

3/3

19

1

118

112

6

BUF

2.

Jordan Howard PHI

10

63

0

0/0

0

0

35

35

0

NO

3.

D’Andre Swift DET

14

136

1

3/4

0

0

15

34

-19

CLE

Hey, this is much better than last week! Swift only ran for four first downs against Cleveland, but that will happen when 10 of your 14 carries come with 10 yards or more to go, including two with 20 yards or more to go. But each of his first downs (all of which came in the third quarter) gained at least 12 yards, including a 57-yard touchdown.

4.

Miles Sanders PHI

16

94

0

0/1

0

0

27

33

-6

NO

Though Sanders did lose a fumble, all of his carries gained at least 1 yard, and he had three first downs on gains of 10, 14, and 25 yards. He also gains 29 rushing DYAR due to opponent adjustments.

5.

Nick Chubb CLE

22

130

0

2/2

14

1

51

33

19

DET

 

Worst Running Back by DYAR (Total)

Rk

Player

Team

Runs

Rush
Yds

Rush
TD

Rec

Rec
Yds

Rec
TD

Total
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Rec
DYAR

Opp

1.

Myles Gaskin MIA

23

89

0

3/4

7

1

-29

-27

-2

NYJ

Well, this is getting repetitive. This is the third time in six weeks Gaskin has been our worst-ranked running back. Gaskin is last among running backs this year with -78 DYAR. He’s not going to come close to the record in that category (Jonathan Wells had -241 with the expansion Texans in 2002), but it has not been a good year. Against the Jets, Gaskin ran for four first downs on gains of 20, 14, 4, and 3 yards. Those four carries made up 46% of his yardage on the day; he averaged 2.5 yards on his other 19 carries. He was stuffed a half-dozen times. His receiving numbers were similar: he had a 5-yard touchdown, but his other two catches were 1-yard gains on first-and-10.

 

Worst Running Back by DYAR (Rushing)

Rk

Player

Team

Runs

Rush
Yds

Rush
TD

Rec

Rec
Yds

Rec
TD

Total
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Rec
DYAR

Opp

1.

Myles Gaskin MIA

23

89

0

3/4

7

1

-29

-27

-2

NYJ

 

Five Best Wide Receivers and Tight Ends by DYAR

Rk

Player

Team

Rec

Att

Yds

Avg

TD

Total
DYAR

Opp

1.

Justin Jefferson MIN

8

10

169

21.1

2

102

GB

Jefferson’s totals include zero DYAR for his one carry for 3 yards. Seven of his eight catches gained first downs, including 9- and 23-yard touchdowns and gains of 56 and 43 yards, plus a 37-yard DPI.

2.

Davante Adams GB

7

8

115

16.4

2

69

MIN

Each of Adams’ catches gained at least 8 yards and a first down, the longest a gain of 37. His touchdowns covered 10 and 18 yards.

3.

Elijah Moore NYJ

8

11

141

17.6

1

57

MIA

Moore’s totals include 11 DYAR for his one carry for 15 yards. He had five catches for first downs, including 22- and 23-yard gains as well as a 62-yard touchdown.

4.

Deebo Samuel SF

1

2

15

15.0

0

56

JAX

If Jonathan Taylor had not gone insane against Buffalo, our main essay this week would probably have covered Deebo Samuel’s weird-ass (but effective!) season. Maybe we’ll get to that in a later week. For now, we’ll note that Samuel’s total of 56 DYAR includes 58 rushing DYAR, and no, that’s not a typo. He ran eight times for 79 yards, including a 25-yard touchdown and three other gains of 11 yards or more, though he was stuffed twice. His one catch was a 15-yard gain on second-and-6.

5.

Chris Godwin TB

6

6

65

10.8

1

51

NYG

Godwin’s totals include 4 rushing DYAR for his one carry for 7 yards. Five of his catches picked up first downs, including a 13-yard touchdown.

 

Worst Wide Receiver or Tight End by DYAR

Rk

Player

Team

Rec

Att

Yds

Avg

TD

Total
DYAR

Opp

1.

Kadarius Toney NYG

7

12

40

5.7

0

-39

TB

Toney’s only first down came on a 7-yard gain on fourth-and-2 that came with the Giants down 27-10 late in the third quarter. His longest catches were a pair of 8-yard gains on third-and-9 and third-and-10.





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